BATOD
The British Association of Teachers of the Deaf
Promoting Excellence in Deaf Education

i-learn, u-learn, e-learn workshops

London - Wandsworth venue

Available at all venues via Phonak i-learn video conferencing

ADeaf pupils video conferencing with LGfL The team from Sellincourt
Using video conferencing in the classroom – our adventure with LGfL - interactive working.

This workshop will be available during Workshop One (on Saturday morning) at the LONDON venue and via Phonak i-learn at the other venues.

The workshop will cover the project brief for the London Grid for Learning Project involving schools and Units across the country. What technical resources required to successfully carry out such a project will be discussed.

The team will talk about the process and show video clips of conference project in school- research, stories, script, resources, props, mode of communication. They will discuss parental involvement, permission, publicity, internet a show the school and wider community were involved.

They will show a selection of video clips from deaf and hearing children with their opinions of the experience. Then they will set up a ‘mini’ demonstration video conference experience which attendees could join in to experience firsthand.

BWriting in plain English By video link - Rachel O’Neill
Chair Jenny Baxter/Bev McCracken

This workshop will be available during Workshop Two (on Saturday afternoon) in EDINBURGH and via Phonak i-learn at the other venues.

This workshop will introduce you to techniques for writing in plain English for deaf learners.
We will explore in more detail which deaf learners may benefit from modified English and what are the important considerations when we want to adapt a text. For example:

  • Is it dangerous to modify an original text because some of the important features of cohesion could be lost?
  • Could having modified handouts actually delay the growth of a wider vocabulary or understanding of more complex grammatical features?
  • What are the important features to focus on about grammar, cohesion and vocabulary?
  • How can we use layout and visual features to make texts easier to read?
This fun and interactive workshop will be supported by tutors at each of the three centres.

CJoin Together Project Harold Johnson

This workshop will be available during Workshop One (on Saturday morning) in LONDON and EDINBURGH and via i-Visit.

Information will be shared concerning where teachers can find web-based information regarding 20 ‘recommended practices’ that have been designed to enhance the literacy, science and math performance of students who are deaf/hard of hearing will be shared.Additional information will be shared concerning the ‘problems & solutions’ documents of 150+ ‘Master Teachers’ of the deaf from the US.

Wandsworth, London workshops

DOnlineinset for TAs Jacqui Webber-Gant

OnlineInset has developed a range of online training courses designed to be delivered by advisory teachers and other professionals who support children with special educational needs. The Berkshire Sensory Consortium has written the newly released HI and VI courses in association with Mary Hare School. This workshop will enable delegates to access the materials and view them so they can see whether they would want to join.

ESTARS – Computerised Pupil Tracking System ……developed by schools for schools. Matthew Ward, Malcolm Strang et al

Gain an overview of system, package creation and how STARS can aid pupil tracking and assessment. This exciting innovation, previously demonstrated at the NCHSSDC, has now been installed in over 80 schools in Gloucestershire. The impact has been significant in securing Assessment for Learning and engaging staff and pupils through easy access to meaningful performance data. The software is designed to provide instant access to all users throughout the school community and, if necessary, to other professional bodies.

The system enables schools and other services providers to store, evaluate and track an individual pupil, groups or a whole cohort over their educational life.

One of the key aspects of the software allows schools to develop their own assessment packages to match their individual setting or a specific educational need. Originally developed by Eastington Primary School, the system was recognised by the DSCF with a Leading Aspects Award for, ‘effective networking and sharing of good practice through a personalised and flexible system for tracking pupils’ achievement’.

FWebcams and Internet - are you virtually ready? Rubbena Aurangzeb-Tariq, Deafax

Deafax has 21 years of experience of working with technology in new ways - but it is continually changing. Now days everyone is online and chatting to people virtually. But how prepared are you? This workshop focuses on webcam technologies, virtual working, and internet safety.

The workshop will look at how to set up webcams and how you can use them to link with people. It looks at uses with children and youth people as well as the how they can be used with parents and other schools. It gives you advice on internet safety and how to protect yourselves and your students and finally gives you an opportunity to have a go yourself.

GWidgit Software: Making Information Accessible Tina Voizey, SEN Consultant, Widgit Software

Much of the information we ask learners to decipher can be text heavy and confusing. The Communicate: Series along with the support of the recently updated Widgit Literacy Symbol set and Let’s Sign and Write (LS&W) graphics pack gives the tools for making information accessible where it might not have been otherwise.

We will look at specific applications of our symbol-based technologies such as; SymWriter, a word processor with built in support for struggling writers, In Print, a flexible desktop publisher, By Choice, a activity based program that encourages learning through making choices and Webwide, the world’s most accessible internet browser creating simplified and symbolised layouts of most web pages. We will look at how the LS&W graphics can be integrated and examples of ready-made downloadable resources. All of which enable teachers to quickly, easily and appropriately differentiate curriculum allowing pupils, no matter their reading level, to access content and its meaning while boosting participation and confidence.

HCustomise multimedia software Joyce Sewell-Rutter

An opportunity to see what Clicker 5 can do to support talking, reading and writing at the primary phase. This is multimedia software with immense flexibility to help the individual child. The session will use case studies and cover curriculum areas, and language and literacy development showing how resources can be customised. The www.learningrids.com website can offer additional resources. Clicker 5 is particularly useful for deaf children with specific additional language or literacy difficulties but other resources to support these children will be explored, especially DASLLD materials.

IDeaf awareness – Birmingham’s materials for training sessions Lynda Holland

Birmingham Team for Children with Hearing Impairment wanted a resource to use for training in schools. developed a DVD entitled 'Successfully including the Deaf Child in the Mainstream School'. is available with additional subtitles and BSL interpretation. The DVD includes film which is delivered in chapters for use in training. It includes audio tracks which simulate listening experiences, another useful training resource. included are written materials on a variety of topics. will be outlining what is available on this DVD and introducing a new DVD the Service have produced on supporting the Asian deaf child within the family.

JThe application of Cued Speech Anne Worsfold

You know what CS is but come to the workshop to discover how it can be effectively used:

  • to support the acquisition of spoken and written languages;
  • with babies; with children who have BSL as a first language;
  • with Thrass or Jolly Phonics.

Practical - Take the 15 minute challenge! At the end of this informal practical session you will be able to cue simple consonant/vowel/consonant words – and see for yourselves how easily you can help your pupils (both babies and children) to understand English.

E-learning for parents and professionals – Introducing the easy, remote, fun way to learn.

KCollaborative working between S<s and ToDs – Judy Halden and Sarah Beazley

In the light of recent political policies and publications regarding the importance of multi-agency working (The Children Act 2004, Every Child Matters, 2004) the British Association of Teachers of the Deaf (BATOD) and the Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists (RCSLT) set up a working party (Dec 2005) to review the way that both professions are currently working together and write a position paper that outlines principles of good collaborative practice, illustrated by examples and protocols The paper has now been agreed by both these professional bodies (October 2007).

This seminar will provide an opportunity to discuss the Position Paper, how to put its principles into practice, as well as to explore ways in which similar procedures and protocols could be implemented locally in order to provide more integrated and effective services for their deaf children.

Boston Spa workshops

ADeaf pupils video conferencing with LGfL - the team from Sellincourt (from Wandsworth via Phonak i-learn)
BWriting in plain English (from Edinburgh via Phonak i-learn) - Rachel O’Neill Chair Catherine Baldwin
MDeveloping CPD opportunities Wendy McCracken

i learn u learn e-learn the virtual world is it a more comfortable place and where does it intersect with the ‘real’ world? Developments and challenges with e-learning. Exploring what CPD you think you want and what you really need, referring to key research with deaf children and its implications for practice. Look at implications for delivery of CPD.

N Let’s Sign & Write with Widgit Cath Smith

The presentation will start with brief background of the Let’s Sign graphics and how they are being developed. Samples will be shown of how the graphics can be used in flashcards, worksheets and activities to teach vocabulary, reinforce word recognition and spelling, and how sign graphics can be linked to text in story books and other work books. Ebooks can help to concentrate on the vocabulary for each particular child and groups of children. Examples of these will be shown – from simple black and white graphics to teach a song or rhyme, colour topic flashcards eg Food & Drink and colourful interactive ebooks that can include a small quiz.

Materials such as Days of the Week, Weather Charts and posters can also be used to support and encourage whole school and family involvement. Ready-made download packages for curriculum topics can also be used and adapted using the sign graphics.

O Visual literacy Clare Armitage, Alison Phillips and Joanne Kirsopp

A seminar, sponsored by Deaf@x, provided time for knowledgeable colleagues to come together, share their expertise and take part in some low-key action research which may find ways to enhance current practice in the teaching of reading to deaf children.

The research into Visual reading with Prue Goodwin is looking at techniques of accessing stories through the pictures and relating this to working with deaf children both oral/aural and BSL users.  Clare, Alison and Joanne have been on the initial day's training and are trialling, with pre-school and primary resource children, the techniques that they discussed. During the workshop they will share their views on how successful the method is and some views from a further session in Reading. They will explain what they have been doing and to lead a discussion on it.

P WRAT or ALK? Angela Cordingley

  • How do you assess older pupils at the earliest stages of reading?
  • How do you measure reading progress when children cannot gain a reading age on conventional tests?
  • How can you determine which literacy skills are weaker than others and then put an intervention programme in place?
The WRAT and ALK are assessments being used at St John’s School for the Deaf to address these issues. This workshop is led by practising Teachers of the Ddeaf, offering practical advice on the use of the WRAT and ALK to offer a pathway for deaf pupils who have found the road to literacy particularly long.

Q Collaborative working between S<s and ToDs Maria Cameron (St John’s School)

In the light of recent political policies and publications regarding the importance of multi-agency working (The Children Act 2004, Every Child Matters, 2004) the British Association of Teachers of the Deaf (BATOD) and the Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists (RCSLT) set up a working party (Dec 2005) to review the way that both professions are currently working together and write a position paper that outlines principles of good collaborative practice, illustrated by examples and protocols The paper has now been agreed by both these professional bodies (October 2007).

This seminar will provide an opportunity to discuss the Position Paper, how to put its principles into practice, as well as to explore ways in which similar procedures and protocols could be implemented locally in order to provide more integrated and effective services for their deaf children.

R Cued Speech Alison Paton and Tina Kirwin

Alison and Tina are both Teachers of the Deaf and currently using cued speech in school and other situations. During this workshop they will;

  • give brief background talk about Cued Speech (CS)
  • show a video of CS currently being used with one or more pupils in mainstream and also discuss other uses in MDHNS (Manchester Hearing Needs Service) ie with U2s, at secondary level, with parents. They will demonstrate how CS works, using hand-shapes - teaching some useful words eg BOO! shhhh, oops, bye etc
  • provide info on courses provided by Cued Speech Association.

Moray House, Scotland workshops

ADeaf pupils video conferencing with LGfL - the team from Sellincourt (from Wandsworth via Phonak i-learn)
BWriting in plain English - Rachel O’Neill This worlkshop will be video conferenced to the other venues
CDeaf Educator training, resources and support on-line (from Michigan USA via Deaf-Ed i-Visit) - Harold Johnson
W Widgit Software: Making Information Accessible Martin Fisher, SEN Consultant,Widgit Software

Much of the information we ask learners to decipher can be text heavy and confusing. The Communicate: Series along with the support of the recently updated Widgit Literacy Symbol set and Let’s Sign and Write (LS&W) graphics pack gives the tools for making information accessible where it might not have been otherwise.

We will look at specific applications of our symbol-based technologies such as; SymWriter, a word processor with built in support for struggling writers, In Print, a flexible desktop publisher, By Choice, a activity based program that encourages learning through making choices and Webwide, the world’s most accessible internet browser creating simplified and symbolised layouts of most web pages. We will look at how the LS&W graphics can be integrated and examples of ready-made downloadable resources. All of which enable teachers to quickly, easily and appropriately differentiate curriculum allowing pupils, no matter their reading level, to access content and it’s meaning while boosting participation and confidence.

X Collaborative working between S<s and ToDs

In the light of recent political policies and publications regarding the importance of multi-agency working (The Children Act 2004, Every Child Matters, 2004) the British Association of Teachers of the Deaf (BATOD) and the Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists (RCSLT) set up a working party (Dec 2005) to review the way that both professions are currently working together and write a position paper that outlines principles of good collaborative practice, illustrated by examples and protocols The paper has now been agreed by both these professional bodies (October 2007).

This seminar will provide an opportunity to discuss the Position Paper, how to put its principles into practice, as well as to explore ways in which similar procedures and protocols could be implemented locally in order to provide more integrated and effective services for their deaf children.

Y Early Parent-Baby Interaction: The Small Talk Package Suzanne Harrigan [The Ear Foundation]

The Small Talk package was produced by The Ear Foundation and Cochlear Europe for the families of newly identified babies and their supporting professionals. The purpose of this resource is to inform and reassure parents who may be struggling to come to terms with the discovery that their baby is Deaf whilst also having to adjust to the demands and rigours of parenthood. The package aims to;

  1. Impart key messages about the benefits of early playful talk
  2. Make parents aware of how adult and baby communication changes as the baby gets a little older.
  3. Share specific advice about the adaptations that are necessary to provide optimal communication opportunities for Deaf babies.
This presentation aims to show how Teachers of the Deaf can use the resource during their early visits to families following identification to support their current good practise.

Z Making English fully accessible through CS using the language of BSL

Presenter Cate Calder will be describing her groundbreaking work at the Royal Academy for Deaf Education, Exeter. Also covered will be other applications of CS including use with babies and at school with THRASS or Jolly phonics.

E-learning for parents and professionals – Introducing the easy, remote, fun way to learn.

Practical – There will also be an informal practical session where you will learn to cue simple consonant/vowel/consonant words – and see for yourselves how easily you can help your pupils (both babies and children) to understand English.