BATOD
The British Association of Teachers of the Deaf
Promoting Excellence in Deaf Education

Working with deafblind people

Deafblindness: where do we come from, where are we, and where are we going?Phonak iLEARN and the Ear Foundation event: Twilight Lecture with Claus Moller which took place on Thursday 3rd April at 5.30 pm UK time to an audience at the Ear Foundation, Nottingham, UK  This page provides a link to the video recording which lasts 1 hour 12 mins.
Working with deafblind people15 Jan
How good are you at assessing Deaf Blind clients?Lecture presented by Mary Foster at the Phonak Virtual Conference May 2007 (33 minutes). This page provides a link to the video recording which lasts 33minutes.
Working with deafblind people15 Jan
Count me in...This article is credited to Patricia Gibbons (Advisory teacher for Deafblind/MSI children, Inclusion Service for VI, Manchester) - supported by Kerry Taylor, Lynn Garritty, Sue Meredith and the staff and children of Broad Oak School. Patricia describes how they worked to enable everyone around Samir, who is nine and deafblind, to ensure that he is included in as much as possible - and more! The most positive and exciting thing to see is the extent to which he is now fully embedded in his local community, always with a friend to walk to school, conversing with the window-cleaner, or telling his mum what he did at school.
Working with deafblind people15 Jan
A tactile audiogram for deafblind pupilsMarion Brushett, Wandsworth Hearing-Impaired Service describes how a tactile audiogram for deafbliond pupils was developed at Linden Lodge school in Wandsworth, South-West London. The idea for a tactile audiogram developed from the increasing need for deafblind children to have access to information.
Working with deafblind people15 Jan
Is vision care and assessment crucial for deaf children and young deaf people?Barbara Homer (NDCS) and Mary Guest (SENSE) explain about the work of the National Deaf Children's Society and Sense raising the profile of, and identifying the need for, good eye care for deaf children. Subsequently collaboration with key people who work with deaf children, with parents, and essentially with ophthalmologists has resulted in the production of quality standards and good practice guidelines on optimum vision care for the deaf child.
Working with deafblind people15 Jan
Early Support for deafblind babiesDuring phase 1 of the ESPP work, SENSE was invited to provide training for a multi-professional group working on the project in Manchester. The group comprised speech and language therapists, health professionals from the NHSP, the audiology teams, orthoptist team, and teachers from both the hearing and visual impairment services. Patricia Gibbons, Advisory Teacher for Deafblind/MSI shares the work that has been going on to support deafblind babies.
Working with deafblind people15 Jan
The deafblind experienceMany National Curriculum Teachers throughout the UK have already visited Deafblind UK's National Centre for Deafblindness and experienced first hand the excellent 'Deafblind Experience'. The programmes offer a great opportunity for students to find out more about the disability of deafblindness and suit individuals of all ages and abilities who are studying PSHE and Citizenship.
Working with deafblind people15 Jan
Bringing teenage deafblind cochlear implant users togetherSense, the organisation for deafblind people, has collaborated with The Ear Foundation and through them with cochlear implant centres across the UK, to bring deafblind teenagers with cochlear implants together for the first time. This is a report of the meeting.
Working with deafblind people15 Jan
Using objects to promote early communication and language for deafblind childrenPatricia Gibbons, Advisory Teacher for Deafblind Children, Manchester, expands on the language acquisition of deafblind children. Children with limited or no vision take longer than sighted children to acquire language. Parents and teachers are advised of the importance of speaking, providing commentary and descriptions of the child's actions, events taking place, who is in the room, and so on. Once they have cottoned on to language, blind children depend on speech to support tactile information to access and understand the world around them.
Working with deafblind people15 Jan